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Wednesday, February 29

  1. user_add nycdem nycdem joined sou-parks
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Thursday, June 9

  1. page Public Good edited ... Suppose there is a community with a lot of children, the town joins together and decides they …
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    Suppose there is a community with a lot of children, the town joins together and decides they will create a community playground. There are a number of ways the town could execute this:
    A group of them could pool together enough money to afford a play ground. (This however then has complications in the upkeep of the playground)
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    maintain a playground
    They could establish user-fees where each child will be charged a given amount. This income from the children would then pay off the initial costs of installing a playground and then the upkeep of the
    playground.
    (view changes)
    11:48 pm
  2. page How Much Is a Tree Worth? edited ... it, the more valuable it makes adds to a property, Valuable Aspects of a Tree: Recreat…
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    it, the more valuable it makesadds to a property,
    Valuable Aspects of a Tree:
    Recreational/Scenic Uses
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    how much they add,value trees add to a recreational experience, economists can
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    a time, there is such a thing as opportunity cost,costs exist, meaning the
    CO2 Filtered
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    This is something thatknown as an ecosystem service. Ecosystem services should be
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    cutting any treestree down because
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    carbon sequestration.
    Another example of an ecosystem service is water filtration. For example, in 1989 the EPA ordered the City of New York to build an $8 billion water filtration facility. This facility would cost $300 million annually to operate. Rather than fund this expensive project, the city spent $2 billion to restore and protect the Catskill Mountain watershed. This effectively allowed the 2000-square-mile forest to do the work of the proposed $8 billion water treatment plant. Thus far, the watershed has provided New York with $6 billion worth of clean water for much cheaper than the water treatment plant would have.

    Effects On Property Values {World_Canada_Rain_forest_007534_.jpg}
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    on property values (Need article on this).values. Let's say
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    of other househouses in the
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    hedonic pricing.
    Contingent valuation may not always be the best way to measure this. Econometric techniques exist that can allow us to compare a large number of different houses based on numerous factors that contribute to the value of the house (such as number of bedrooms, presence or absence of trees, proximity to colleges, etc.). We can then perform a linear regression and isolate the likely impacts of any single factor on the final sell price of the house. Many economists consider contingent valuation methods to be of questionable veracity, and would prefer to see other techniques used. This article might benefit from discussing all the different ways economists can approach the problem, and what are the pros/cons of each in context against the others? -Paul (p.s. I have an article for you on this)

    Knowing It Exists
    Trees also have value merely in the knowledge that they exist. Think about your favorite childhood climbing tree. How much would you pay to know that tree isn't being cut down right now? If your childhood memories are somewhat irrelevant and you say $5 is the amount you would pay to save the tree, the fact that it exists is worth $5. This is also known as passive use value, the value of something without actually using it for its productive potential. Another example of passive use is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) which is sparsely traveled, but highly contested when it comes to oil drilling. ANWR has a high passive use value because people like to know the arctic wilderness exists unperturbed. More information on passive use.
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    11:47 pm
  3. page As A Matter Of Fact, Money Does Grow On Trees edited Barcott, Bruce. "As A Matter of Fact, Money Does Grow On Tress." Outside Mar. 2005: 106-…
    Barcott, Bruce. "As A Matter of Fact, Money Does Grow On Tress." Outside Mar. 2005: 106-23. Print.
    In this article, Barcott illustrates the non-market values of national forests. He outlines the value of services provided by forests in the form of water filtration which provides millions of dollars worth of service. The rafting industry also provides up to $1.5 million of annual revenue in certain forests and this is threatened by the one-time profit of irresponsible resource extraction as many national forests loses their protection. To emphasize the worth of natural services Barcott cites an event in New York where, instead of spending $8 billion to build a water filtration plant, the city spent $2 billion to restore the local watershed and filter water that way. The watershed has provided $6 billion in water filtration services and is still functioning. National forests generated $125 billion of economic activity annually, 75% of which was associated with recreation and only 15% of which was associated with mining and timber.

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    1:54 pm
  4. page Bibliography edited ... Ayn Perry (2002) Trusts and Easements for the Protection of Valued Lands Trails and Open Space…
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    Ayn Perry (2002) Trusts and Easements for the Protection of Valued Lands Trails and Open Space Issues in Planning
    B
    Barcott, Bruce. "As A Matter of Fact, Money Does Grow On Tress." Outside Mar. 2005: 106-23. Print.
    Bateman, Diamand (1996). Household Willingness to Pay and Farmer's Willingness to Accept compensation for stablishing a Recreational Woodland Journal of Environmental Planning & Management Vol. 39 Issue 1
    Bateman, I. J., & Langford, I. H. (January 01, 1997). Budget-constraint, temporal, and question-ordering effects in contingent valuation studies. Environment & Planning A, 29, 7, 1215.
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    1:41 pm

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